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 Jacaranda 
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Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 3:59 pm
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Location: Loughborough, Leics, central UK
Post Jacaranda
I am going to guess that Jacaranda do not go down to a very cold temperature though I believe one of my friends is trying to grow one in Northern Ireland...not to self must ask him, anyway a few blatant shots of one I snapped in Cyprus last month.
This seemed to be quite an old tree looking at the size of the trunk any more shots out there of these flowering beauties

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This Delonix regia was quite chunky too

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Sat Dec 14, 2013 8:00 pm
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Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 5:52 pm
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Location: Hayward- S.F. Bay area Ca.
Post Re: Jacaranda
wow- Never saw a Jacaranda bloom in cones like some tree Echium. If I had seen that,I would have brought home pods off that thing!.
And the other tree,is a Delonix. Summers must be hot in Cyprus.


Sat Dec 14, 2013 8:07 pm
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Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 7:24 pm
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Location: Barcelona, Spain
Post Re: Jacaranda
Stan wrote:
wow- Never saw a Jacaranda bloom in cones like some tree Echium. If I had seen that,I would have brought home pods off that thing!.


It's probably a secondary effect of the too hard pruning, also it's a rare month to be in flower. Some jacarandas make a second floration here in autumn but is rare, and when it happens there are only a few dispersed panicles in each tree.


Sun Dec 15, 2013 3:12 pm
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Joined: Fri Oct 23, 2009 7:34 pm
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Location: Iowa
Post Re: Jacaranda
I have a few from some seeds I bought a few year ago,one is 3-4' tall
and will be planted back out again...would be neat if it flowered some day!


Sun Dec 15, 2013 4:21 pm
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Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 3:54 am
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Location: Berkeley, California
Post Re: Jacaranda
Older mature J. mimosifolia have taken down to -4°C in the past, but young trees are usually heavily damaged or killed with that cold. In my personal observations of how they grow in my own neighborhood, the more extended summer heat and shelter from cooler ocean/bay winds you can give them, the better they bloom. My assumptions on typical summer weather for Ireland is that warm days and only mild breezes aren't very typical, and that will tend to inhibit blooming. Wind protection in cooler, non-subtropical climates makes a hige difference, perhaps more so than marginal winter cold that isn't bad enough to cause major dieback each winter. They grow and bloom rather well with a few mild freezes each winter here, especially with hotter summers than we get here in Berkeley. In the warmest parts of San Francisco, some bloom quite heavily in the warmer Mission District up against a south facing building.I notice them suffering on my street which is a wind tunnel for bay winds, while cross streets just around the corner which aren't as windy, bloom well each summer, but still not as heavily as they do in even warmer Oakland neighborhoods. Consistently warm days into the low 70's°F and above seem to be a dividing temperature line.

Looks like all those street trees get pruned back to stubs often enough. Not the most graceful way to grow them, and all that weakly attached new branching is very prone to wind damage, the wood is quite soft.

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Sun Dec 15, 2013 5:13 pm
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Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 3:59 pm
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Location: Loughborough, Leics, central UK
Post Re: Jacaranda
Do you guys think it possible to grow and flower one in a pot and if so how big would it need to be ...any guesses?


Sun Dec 15, 2013 7:08 pm
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Location: Hayward- S.F. Bay area Ca.
Post Re: Jacaranda
Yes, no doubt at all. I had one flower in a 5 gallon nursery pot in my back yard. I would guess the height of the plant alone was 5' and age no more then the same. They will never bloom Bonsai style though. Still,5 gallons isn't much more then a paint bucket size.
One thought: Mine was most likely grown from a cutting to insure the deep blue flowers. Seedlings vary I would think. But,they will flower I'm willing to bet.


Sun Dec 15, 2013 11:13 pm
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Joined: Sat Dec 01, 2007 6:15 pm
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Location: Brookings, OR, USA
Post Re: Jacaranda
Identifying the various species of jacaranda can be difficult as there are about 50 of them, and flower dissection may be needed to parse them. Outside of the tropics, only Jacaranda acutifolia and J. cuspidifolia are commonly seen, but in more tropical areas other species are also used.

Some jacs flower on bare wood whereas many others will only bloom on fully foliaged trees. Many will form inflorescences from both terminal and axillary buds, but some species form panicles from terminal buds only. It looks like this could be one of those species.


Mon Dec 16, 2013 3:40 am
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Location: Brookings, OR, USA
Post Re: Jacaranda
abellan_s wrote:
Stan wrote:
wow- Never saw a Jacaranda bloom in cones like some tree Echium. If I had seen that,I would have brought home pods off that thing!.


It's probably a secondary effect of the too hard pruning, also it's a rare month to be in flower. Some jacarandas make a second floration here in autumn but is rare, and when it happens there are only a few dispersed panicles in each tree.


That doesn't seem too likely to me. In theory, topping the branches should result in axillary racemes being produced since apical dominance would be suppressed by pruning. But we only see terminal racemes here, so I'm going to guess that it's a species that doesn't make axillary panicles at all the way that J. acutifolia and J. cuspidifolia do.


Mon Dec 16, 2013 3:47 am
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Post Re: Jacaranda
Even around Sydney Harbour they look ratty on the windward side, and you'd think our harbour is fairly warm by world standards.


Mon Dec 16, 2013 9:37 am
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Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 7:24 pm
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Location: Barcelona, Spain
Post Re: Jacaranda
Steve in Brookings wrote:

That doesn't seem too likely to me. In theory, topping the branches should result in axillary racemes being produced since apical dominance would be suppressed by pruning. But we only see terminal racemes here, so I'm going to guess that it's a species that doesn't make axillary panicles at all the way that J. acutifolia and J. cuspidifolia do.


These branches hasn't been topped, they are the result of a growth from the primary branches/ trunk.

Steve in Brookings wrote:
Some jacs flower on bare wood whereas many others will only bloom on fully foliaged trees. Many will form inflorescences from both terminal and axillary buds, but some species form panicles from terminal buds only. It looks like this could be one of those species.


Mostly Jacaranda mimosifolia bloom on the previous year growth, but as I've mentioned before, some plants reflourish in autumn, and as the tree of the photo probably has not flowered in spring (because it had no branches) it's just flowering now, on the new growth.

Stan wrote:
Yes, no doubt at all. They will never bloom Bonsai style though.
+1 I've my own in a little pot (around 5-7 litres) so it's bonsaized and non flowered ,but I've seen them as little trees flowering in big pots (of course the bigger the better).


Mon Dec 16, 2013 1:31 pm
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Location: Leidschendam, The Netherlands. (52 N latitude)
Post Re: Jacaranda
I saw one in Rome, and more in along the coast near Naples and Salerno. Beautifull trees whenb in flower but not an option here in the cold North!

Alexander

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Tue Dec 17, 2013 3:50 am
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Post Re: Jacaranda
I see on the www.smgrowers.com page for Jacaranda, that mimosifolia and acutifolia are considered two different species, and not synonymous. In the last few years other more unusual Jacaranda species have become available in southern California and south Florida. Photos can be seen on the IPS site, but having seen some of them, I can see why J. mimosifolia is the most popular here in California and South Africa, it is simply the showiest and most colorful in bloom when happy.

While small sized trees only 5 feet tall can be found in bloom here in California, it is much less likely to accomplish in less ideal climates, from everything I've ever read online by Jacaranda aficianados at higher latitudes than ours here at 37°.

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Tue Dec 17, 2013 6:07 am
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Location: Brookings, OR, USA
Post Re: Jacaranda
david feix wrote:
In the last few years other more unusual Jacaranda species have become available in southern California and south Florida. Photos can be seen on the IPS site, but having seen some of them, I can see why J. mimosifolia is the most popular here in California and South Africa, it is simply the showiest and most colorful in bloom when happy.


In Florida, J. cuspidifolia is generally considered the one to have. Superior color forms are named and grafted. Gardino, for example, sells 'Sapphire' and 'Fairchild'. J. mimosifolia seems to do best where summers are bone dry. In Hawaii, J. cuspidifolia grows better at sea level while J. mimosifolia is preferred at elevations above 1500 ft. The most beautiful form, it seems, always comes when ones matches the species with the climate insofar as possible.

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Tue Dec 17, 2013 6:30 am
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Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:42 pm
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Post Re: Jacaranda
Kev Spence wrote:
Do you guys think it possible to grow and flower one in a pot and if so how big would it need to be ...any guesses?


May be worth asking a Bonsai grower? At least the seed is easy to come by

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Tue Dec 17, 2013 8:56 am
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